Benefits of Massage

25 Benefits of Getting a Massage

  

According to the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) Consumer Survey, 72 percent of individuals surveyed claim their primary reason for receiving a massage in the previous 12 months was medical (43 percent) or stress (29 percent).


A growing body of research supports the health benefits of massage therapy for conditions such as stress, fibromyalgia, low-back pain and more. Find out how you can benefit from adding massage therapy to your health and wellness routine.


1. Relieve stress

2. Relieve postoperative pain

3. Reduce anxiety

4. Manage low-back pain

5. Help fibromyalgia pain

6. Reduce muscle tension

7. Enhance exercise performance

8. Relieve tension headaches

9. Sleep better

10. Ease symptoms of depression

11. Improve cardiovascular health

12. Reduce pain of osteoarthritis

13. Decrease stress in cancer patients

14. Improve balance in older adults

15. Decrease rheumatoid arthritis pain

16. Temper effects of dementia

17. Promote relaxation

18. Lower blood pressure

19. Decrease symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

20. Help chronic neck pain

21. Lower joint replacement pain

22. Increase range of motion

23. Decrease migraine frequency

24. Improve quality of life in hospice care

25. Reduce chemotherapy-related naus

Therapeutic Massage Modalities

Deep Tissue

 Deep tissue massage therapy focuses on the deepest layers of muscle tissue, tendons and fascia.


Swedish

As the best-known type of bodywork performed today, one of the primary goals of the Swedish massage technique is to relax the entire body.  

Lomi Lomi

The strokes are done with the hands and forearms and are often long and sweeping, much like long, rolling waves traveling along the body. 

Thai

 The therapist puts you through a series of stretches that cover the entire body.  Thai massage also includes deep-pressure point work to stimulate the sen, or the body’s energy pathways. 

Hot Stone

 The therapist will either place the hot stones on specific points along the body to create soothing pressure or use them to actually massage muscles with steady pressure. 

Sports

 Therapeutic sports massage is a type of massage technique that focuses on treating soft tissue aches, pain and injuries that are associated with recreational activities. Massage can reduce muscle stiffness and improve relaxation by reducing heart rate and blood pressure. 

Lymphatic

 Lymphatic massage is a gentle-pressure technique used to move the waste fluids away from the damaged area. 

Cupping

 Cupping therapy is an ancient form of alternative medicine in which a therapist puts special cups on your skin for a few minutes to create suction. People get it for many purposes, including to help with pain, inflammation, blood flow, relaxation and well-being, and as a type of deep-tissue massage. 

Aromatherapy

 Aromatherapy massage is Swedish massage therapy using massage oil or lotion that contains essential oils (highly concentrated plant oils). 

Chair

  Chair massage is a style of seated massage that is typically short—10 or 15 minutes—and focuses on your back, shoulders and neck and arms. 

Active Isolated Stretching

 Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) is one of the methods of stretching most used by today's athletes, massage therapists, personal/athletic trainers, and professionals. The Active Isolated Stretching technique involves the method of holding each stretch for only two seconds. 

Trigger Point

A trigger point is a tight area within muscle tissue that causes pain in other parts of the body. Trigger point massage therapy is specifically designed to alleviate the source of the pain through cycles of isolated pressure and release. In this type of massage for trigger point therapy, the recipient actively participates through deep breathing as well as identifying the exact location and intensity of the discomfort.